Packing Clothes

As I’m going back and forth between Cairo and Alexandria, I have tried several ways of packing clothes to prevent wrinkles and folds. (I don’t like to iron a lot!)
Today I wanted to try out something new and I found this way called : “bundle-wrapping”.
The following is the way how to do it:

How to pack by Bundle Wrapping

excerpt written by Doug Dyment

A solution to the problem of wrinkles and unwanted creases, though it involves some inconvenience, is the use of the bundle wrapping technique. It involves the careful wrapping of clothes around a central core object, avoiding the folds that result in creases. Furthermore, the tension created in the fabric by the wrapping process significantly reduces the chances of wrinkling:

Begin by selecting the item that will form the core of the bundle: an organizer pouch is a good choice. The optimal size will depend upon the configuration of your bag and the amount of clothing to be packed, but around 11 x 16″ (30 x 40cm) should work well. The pouch is filled with soft items (socks, swimsuit, undergarments, sheet bag, etc.) to form a cushion around which the clothing will be wrapped.

Clothing is wrapped in a specific order, so that the larger and more tailored garments will end up on the outside of the bundle, with less easily wrinkled pieces closer to the core. An appropriate sequence might be:

  • jacket
  • skirts, dresses (a particularly long, straight dress or skirt might be better placed before the jacket)
  • long-sleeved shirts
  • short-sleeved shirts
  • slacks
  • sweater, knits
  • shorts

Tip: Button the fronts of shirts, and perhaps the jacket (unless it is overly wide).

If your bag features a zipper around three full sides (as recommended in my luggage discussion), it will open flat for packing. Begin by taking the item highest on the above list: a jacket, if you’re packing one. Lay it flat, face down on the bottom of the bag, collar just touching one of the long sides of the bag (but not enough to curl up against it).

The bottom of the jacket will extend well outside the bag, of course, as will the sleeves (which should be oriented so as to lie the most naturally). Smooth everything out carefully, eliminating any wrinkles. Note that tailored jackets are the exception to the rule: all other garments are placed face up.

Continue with the remaining garments, alternating the (long) sides of the bag that the collars touch (to keep an even thickness). Slacks are placed so that their waistbands touch one of the bag’s short sides; this is also true of most skirts (which are often folded lengthwise first). Strive for a smooth placement, avoiding wrinkles as much as possible.

When all items are down, place the core on top, forming the centre of the bundle. Now work your way back down the clothing stack, wrapping each piece around the slowly growing bundle before moving on to the next item (don’t interleave garments with one another). Bring up the bottom of each garment, wrapping it as far around the bundle as it will go, then the sleeves, usually straight across (and around). Some prefer to wrap the sleeves first, then the body; do whatever works best for you.

With jackets, it is generally preferable to wrap the sleeves first, crossing them in more of an X-shape across the bundle (because of the tailoring in the shoulders). Wrap the bundle firmly.

As a final step, place the resulting bundle in your bag, and tie it in firmly with the bag’s tie-down straps. If the bundle is allowed to shift around during travel, much of your work will have been in vain.
When you arrive at your destination, open out the bundle to let the clothes “relax”.

You can find the diagram

Also, here is where I got the info from, there are several other ways explained..
I am going to try this method right now! And I will tell you if it works for me :)!
(I hope I will catch the train…)


Originally Posted By Laila Hussein to Thoughts & Tips at 2/14/2008 01:33:00 PM

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